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Friday, October 16, 2020 | History

2 edition of Distributional impacts of carbon pricing found in the catalog.

Distributional impacts of carbon pricing

Sebastian Rausch

Distributional impacts of carbon pricing

a general equilibrium approach with micro-data for households

by Sebastian Rausch

  • 258 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementSebastian Rausch, Gilbert E. Metcalf, John M. Reilly
SeriesNBER working paper series -- working paper 17087, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research : Online) -- working paper no. 17087.
ContributionsMetcalf, Gilbert E., Reilly, John M., National Bureau of Economic Research
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHB1
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25021662M
LC Control Number2011657305

The results show regressive distributional effects of carbon pricing across provinces, i.e. poor provinces are affected more by the price. Carbon pricing also shows rural-urban regressivity (i.e. rural households are impacted more heavily than urban households)in more than half of the provinces. Many policy proposals to limit greenhouse-gas emissions revolve around efforts to tax carbon emissions. But many studies point out that such energy taxes are regressive. This column models the distributional impacts of carbon pricing on o US households, challenging the view that the policy by itself is .

  A carbon tax alters the relative prices of the goods and services that households purchase. The source-side impact is the change in a household’s nominal labor, capital, and transfer income. A carbon tax generally will affect (positively or negatively) after .   Carbon taxes can increase the cost of basic goods. This modelling study finds that using one-third of carbon tax revenues for cash transfers to the poor can compensate such regressive impacts.

  In concluding, we note that work on distributional impacts of low carbon transitions is increasingly using an energy justice frame, considering not only the different impacts of different population subgroups but also the extent to which those groups’ voices are heard (or not) and represented in decision-making processes (Jenkins et al., ). We consider three carbon tax scenarios that would price carbon at roughly $14, $50, and $73 (in dollars) per metric ton starting in and increasing thereafter between 1 and 3 percent per year. A carbon tax at those rates would raise a significant amount of.


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Distributional impacts of carbon pricing by Sebastian Rausch Download PDF EPUB FB2

Carbon Pricing Instruments (CPIs) can have positive and negative socio-economic impacts on societies. The overall cost or benefit of those impacts, along with how they are distributed, can be influenced by four main areas of impact: 1) Direct impacts from increased costs, 2) Impacts of revenue recycling, 3) Broader economic impacts, and 4) Environmental effects.

Interventions focused on improving energy efficiency can make a substantial difference to the distributional impact of carbon pricing. For example, we show that using 33 per cent of revenues for energy efficiency can ensure fuel-poor households are not adversely affected by carbon taxation; and, depending on the design of the revenue recycling.

Carbon pricing through a cap-and-trade system has very similar impacts to broad based energy taxes – not surprising since over 80% of greenhouse gas emissions are associated with the combustion of fossil fuels (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ).The literature on distributional implications across income groups of energy taxes is a Cited by:   Distributional Impacts of Carbon Pricing on Households (English) Abstract.

Carbon pricing policies that are aligned with the Paris Agreement objectives will have positive and negative socio-economic impacts on society.

Impacts of unabated climate change are expected to disrupt economic development and disproportionally affect. Carbon pricing policies that are aligned with the Paris Agreement objectives will have positive and negative socio-economic impacts on society.

Impacts of unabated climate change are expected to disrupt economic development and disproportionally affect the poorest parts of the population, especially in lower-income countries.

Paying close attention to distributional impacts and political economy constraints is key to understanding why governments around the world keep falling short on carbon pricing. The carbon tax is a frequently discussed economic instrument for carbon emissions mitigation and prevention of global climate change.

However, a range of issues may emerge when introducing a carbon tax; among these issues, the distributional impact has been frequently highlighted as an obstacle to the public acceptance of such a mitigation policy. Distributional Effects of a Carbon Tax Depend on How the Revenue is Spent Columbia University’s Center on Global Energy Policy just released a series of papers on how a carbon tax would reduce greenhouse gas emissions, affect economic growth, and shift the distribution of tax burdens across income groups.

In the end, she said, carbon pricing acceptability is also about the comprehensive range of tools, including addressing distributional impacts proactively, that need to be implemented to make it a lasting and effective policy.

Pricing carbon needs to be linked to investment decision making. Distributional impacts of carbon pricing across households 11 Carbon pricing impacts on poverty 12 Regional impacts of carbon pricing 12 Options to address carbon pricing impacts on households 13 Direct (lump-sum) transfers 14 Subsidies and other transfers   Our Carbon Pricing Calculator allows users to compare the environmental and economic impacts of current legislative proposals (updated as of September ) that place a price on carbon, as well as a custom user-specified carbon tax path.

The measurement dropdown allows users to select a dimension of impact to consider: annual emissions, annual revenues, carbon price, cumulative. The distributional impacts of carbon pricing policies June - Carbon pricing is a key element to cost-effectively achieve emission reductions to combat climate change.

However, to be politically feasible and socially acceptable, carbon pricing mechanisms must address distributional. Keywords: Carbon Pricing, Distributional E ects, General Equilibrium, Micro-Simulation JEL: C61, C68, D58, Q43 1.

Introduction Carbon pricing, whether through a cap and trade system or a tax, can have widely varying distributional impacts. Variation in impacts arises for three reasons.

First, households di er in how they spend their income. First, while results based only on energy expenditure have shown carbon pricing to be regressive we find the full distributional effect to be neutral or slightly progressive. This demonstrates the importance of tracing through all economic impacts and not just focusing on spending side impacts.

We consider three carbon tax scenarios that would price carbon at roughly $14, $50, and $73 per metric ton starting in and increasing thereafter between 1 and 3 percent per year.

A carbon tax at those rates would raise a significant amount of federal revenue, ranging from $ billion ($14/ton scenario) to $3 trillion ($73/ton scenario. We also provide detailed within-group distributional measures of burden impacts from various policy scenarios.

Rausch, Sebastian, Gilbert E. Metcalf and John M. Reilly (), Distributional Impacts of Carbon Pricing: A General Equilibrium Approach with Micro-Data. CGE Books/Articles Important References Submit New Resource. GTAP Resources: Resource Display. GTAP Resource # "Distributional impacts of carbon pricing policies under the Paris Agreement: inter and intra-regional perspective" by.

Downloadable. The introduction of a price on carbon dioxide will have important effects on the U.S. economy, and especially important effects on the electricity sector, which currently accounts for about 40 percent of carbon dioxide emissions.

This paper examines alternative approaches to the distribution of allowance value to the sector, including free allocation to consumers through. Carbon pricing impacts households both by raising the cost of carbon intensive products and by changing factor prices.

A complete analysis requires taking both effects into account. The impact of carbon pricing is determined by heterogeneity in household spending patterns across income groups as well as heterogeneity in factor income patterns.

Despite these complexities, we can offer a way to think about and, to a limited extent, quantify the potential distributional impacts of U.S. carbon pricing both before and after the government uses the revenue, thereby providing a framework for more details as the research matures. We also provide detailed within-group distributional measures of burden impacts from various policy scenarios.

Rausch, Sebastian, Gilbert E. Metcalf und John M. Reilly (), Distributional Impacts of Carbon Pricing: A General Equilibrium Approach with Micro-Data .Distributional impacts of carbon pricing on households 1. INTRODUCTION Carbon pricing policies that are aligned with the Paris Agreement objectives will have positive and negative socio-economic impacts on society.

Impacts of unabated climate change are expected to dis-rupt economic development and disproportionally affect. The distributional consequences are likely to be a major driver of future climate policies. Policymakers will not accept forceful decarbonisation policies if they lead to visibly increasing inequality within their societies.

The distributive effects of climate policies need to be addressed. This report provides a selective review of recent academic literature and experience on the.